12 March 2013

Difference Between Self-Signed and Third Party Security Certificate


SSL Security Certificates
SSL Security Certificates
In the current internet age, almost all web-based enterprises leave no stone upturned to engage their target customers across the globe, which happens to be a move that has inevitably become the most crucial step towards establishing a successful online business. In case of an online ecommerce industry, one may find it difficult to believe that 75 per cent of online consumers seek a security certificate before making any online purchase. That is to make sure that an online website is protected and verified by an SSL certificate.

Those who are unfamiliar with the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), it is a type of security certificates, which are provided mostly by Verisign, Comodo or one of the Symantec brands. In the absence of a valid SSL certificate by one of the reliable aforementioned brands, the reliability of the website is not confirmed and thus, online buyers generally click away and look for some other portals. A security certificate like SSL is actually an electronic credit card that verifies the identity and credentials of an online site, engaged in internet marketing and other types of retail transactions across the World Wide Web.

What is a security certificate?

A website's security certificate is issued by the Certification Authority (CA) and consists of name, serial number, expiration dates and a copy of its owner's public key access. A valid SSL certificate is usually required for encryption of information, messages and digital signatures. Additionally, an SSL certificate for website comprises the digital signature of a certificate issuing authority, in order to enable an online visitor to verify its authenticity and source. Further, security certificate like SSL can be listed in online registries, so as to facilitate authentication procedure for any consumer by allowing checking public keys for verification.    

What is better - Self signed or third party signed security certificate 

A few IT tech-heads believe that expenses on website verification can be easily cut down by removing third party SSL certification from the budget equation. Those with the idea of spending money on a SSL certificate for an ecommerce business portal or an official company site is nothing but trivial, and are walking on a tight rope. A self signed security certificate for an online retail/business website is not a viable substitute for paid certification, offered by Verisign, Comodo or Symantec. As per reports and market studies, the net cost of owning a valid SSL certificate is much greater than the actual price of the certificate. Since, the input costs on data centre storage space, management software and security hardware, amid others, easily add up to a huge sum for building a secure and self signed website.

4 comments:

  1. This article gave me a complete guidance about third party and self signed digital certificate. All this detail helped me to know which is the best option. Thanks.
    digital certificate

    ReplyDelete
  2. I've been using Kaspersky protection for many years now, I'd recommend this anti virus to everyone.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Just received a check for $500.

    Many times people don't believe me when I tell them about how much you can get by taking paid surveys at home...

    So I took a video of myself getting paid $500 for paid surveys.

    ReplyDelete

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